Shark Systems
 
Based in Canada, Shark Systems provides a wide range of electronic equipment and peripherals to consumers, including sound systems, hi-fi equipment, and digital audio players.

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Also known as hi-fi, the term “high fidelity” refers to high-quality reproduction of sound or images. Audio enthusiasts look for high-fidelity equipment with a minimum of noise and distortion, as well as precise frequency response, in order to correctly reproduce a wide range of sounds.

In pursuit of those goals, inventors and scientists have searched throughout the history of recorded sound for ways to make and play back higher quality and more accurate recordings. High-fidelity technology is a result of that history, with advances in home audio leading up to the creation of the first hi-fi devices including the development of reel-to-reel recording, the microgroove record, and better amplifier designs in the 1950s.

In order to produce realistic sound, audio equipment must be able to recreate the subtleties of recorded sounds to the extent of the human capacity to hear them. Most people cannot hear many of the components in a given sound, since the human range of hearing is, at its best, between 20 Hz and 20,000 Hz. Sounds outside that range are inaudible to the human ear, so high-fidelity equipment may not need to reproduce them in order to create realistic sound.

Live sounds approach the ears from many directions at once, however, and in order to approximate the experience of listening to music being played in a concert hall or other venue, recorded music must make use of multiple channels. Modern surround-sound systems address that difficulty by using several different sound signals to create the illusion that sounds are coming from around the listener, just as they would if the listener were in the room with the sound sources. In most cases, these individual channels are played from discrete speakers set around the room at intervals, ranging from four speakers in simpler setups to eight speakers or more in high-end systems.